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Save $350 and Sign Up Now For Lost Remote’s LA Show

Lost Remote is bringing its hit conference, the Lost Remote Show to the West Coast, December 13 in Los Angeles! Sign up before midnight tonight and save $350 on tickets. Named one of the 10 most important emerging technologies by the MIT Technology Review, Social TV and second screen apps are transforming the traditional TV landscape and changing how content is consumed.

At Lost Remote LA, our veteran lineup of brand leaders and industry influencers will share how they’re capitalizing on the second screen, engaging viewers in real time, and amplifying social viewing to craft new types of TV experiences. Join us in LA and gain practical insight and actionable advice on monetizing Social TV in a rapidly multi-screen, multi-
device world.

The speaker roster includes Rob Gelick, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Digital Platforms for CBS Interactive Entertainment, David Howe, President of Syfy, Todd Lefelt, Managing Director of User Experience at Huge, who has worked with clients including Clear Channel, National Geographic, NBC Universal, Samsung, Toyota and Warner Music Group, Michael Sid, CEO and Co-Founder at Mediamorph, who will discuss Social TV Analytics and sentiment measurement tools and more!

Take advantage of early bird prices! Save $350 off onsite prices when you register before October 24.

Learn How To Build a Website To Share Your Clips, Get Free Webcast Access

Our parent company Mediabistro is having a special offer this week for our online classes. If you buy any class from now through Thursday, you can get free access to one of our webcasts.

So, if you want to learn how to build a website or blog to share your video clips, you can take our “Create Your Own Site Using WordPress” class. In addition to the class, you can take a webcast like “Using Social Media To Find Your Next Job” for free.

You can see all the details on the promotion here, or you can use the code “WEBCAST” at checkout.

 

The Walking Dead’s Gale Anne Hurd on Pioneering New Ground in TV

Gale Ann Hurd

Social etiquette question of the day: Is it okay to tweet during a zombie apocalypse? Not if you want to avoid being eaten alive by your now soulless gran (no amount of retweets is going to save you then).

But if you’re just wondering what Rick’s next move is going to be, your hope for survival has increased considerably. In the latest installment in Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, we asked Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer of The Walking Dead, what makes the show so tweeted about:

The Walking Dead is one of the most talked-about TV shows on social media. How does the show achieve such a large social presence and how do you think the industry will change as a result of second-screen viewing?

Well, I think that our show already had a following of people who are technologically advanced to begin with, the early adopters who were comfortable with a deeper dive into related media, whether that was finding out about the comic books and exploring them, participating in second-screening or watching the webisodes or the aftershow, The Talking Dead. People can experience the show 24/7. Now we’re going to be seeing a talk show after Breaking Bad called Talking Bad. I think you’re going to see a lot more of that and they’ll have their presences on the web, too. I think it’s really pioneered new ground on other shows.

For more on Hurd’s creative process and lessons from her career, read So What Do You Do Gale Anne Hurd, Executive Producer of The Walking Dead?

Sherry Yuan

Stephen Hill on Producing the Social-Savvy BET Awards 2013

Stephen Hill

As any LostRemote reader knows, the BET Awards are a pretty big deal. Each June, the show honoring the achievements of African-Americans in music, sports and entertainment, pretty much takes over Twitter as fans tweet every WTF moment. The 2012 ceremony even surpassed the Oscars in social activity, and the network is stepping things up once again for this year’s event, which airs Sunday, June 30 at 8pm ET: the whole thing will be open to the public with the BET Experience in L.A.

For its latest So What Do You Do? interview, Mediabistro spoke with the man behind the ratings juggernaut, BET president of music programming and specials, Stephen Hill

There are many times when people look at the general market award shows and say, “Why’d they ignore this actor?” or “Why’d they ignore this movie?” But we never get that question. We celebrate the achievements of African-Americans throughout the year, whether it’s the BET Awards where we’re doing music, movies and sports, or the BET Honors when we acknowledge people’s lifetime achievements, or Black Girls Rock, which is really about empowering young, Black women — those you’ve heard of and those you haven’t heard of who are doing great things in the community. So we enjoy being able to celebrate our own.

Read more in So What Do you Do, Stephen Hill, BET President of Music Programming and Specials?

 

EW‘s Jess Cagle on How Social TV Helps Print Magazines

It’s accepted knowledge that digital is upending traditional media. But sometimes, that’s just not the case. In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Entertainment Weekly managing editor Jess Cagle tells how social TV has been a boon to his mag’s print sales:

“There is tremendous engagement around television… I will very often look at the social media surrounding of a particular show and make the [cover story] decision based on that,” Cagle explained, pointing toVampire Diaries as an example. “We thought there is so much social media going on around the show, and it went crazy.  Ian Somerhalder tweeted it out to his legion of followers, and that actually translated into print sales.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Jess Cagle, Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly?

Mona Zhang

Ed Gordon: YouTube is ‘the Future of Broadcasting’

For a journo who has found success with decidedly old-school methods, Ed Gordon has some advice for aspiring broadcasters: get on YouTube. “In today’s world… it’s about producing and owning your content,” he told Mediabistro in the latest installment of So What Do You Do?. Gordon also advises young people with dreams of being on the small screen to “learn where your craft is headed,” and talks about the importance of perseverance when it comes to career success:

There are a lot of people who’ve given up trying to get on commercial television and have gone to securing their own YouTube channels, and I think, at the end of the day, that’s going to be the future of broadcasting. People are just going to put stuff out there. They’re gonna have their own YouTube channels, and eventually you’ll be able to buy things from those channels. But I think one of the things that people have to understand is it takes perseverance.

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ed Gordon, Host of Conversations with Ed Gordon?

Mona Zhang

The one thing that will change the business of television

(By Mike Proulx, Co-Author of Social TV, SVP/Director of Digital Strategy at Hill Holliday)

There are conversations happening in the boardrooms of every TV network and MSO about the one thing that could have the most impact on television as we know it today. And it’s something corporate communications professionals across the industry don’t want to be public about – at least not right now.

Read more

Tracey Edmonds’ Alright TV Wants Your Pitches for ‘Positive, Faith-Friendly’ Web Series

After producing hit films like Soul Food and reality shows for BET and TV One, Tracey Edmonds is looking to conquer the Web. In March, she launched Alright TV,  a family- and faith-oriented Web network.

“Alright TV was born from my social media network, and the daily exchange of positive, inspiring and uplifting messages that I have through my social network,” she told Mediabistro in the latest installment of So What Do You Do?. “Viewers are hungry for faith-friendly and inspiration programming, and Alright TV has grown mostly through word of mouth, our online followers and within the faith community.”

Edmonds stressed that her team is always open to pitches for new programming. “We’re going for high entertainment value that has positive messaging. That’s the formula and the directive that we’re asking people to look for when they submit content to us,” she said.

Read the full interview, including contact info for who to send your content pitches to, in So What Do You Do, Tracey Edmonds, Award-Winning TV and Film Producer?

Nicholas Braun

How to Get Your Web TV Show Featured on Blip

Since joining the company last spring, CEO Kelly Day has been hard at work making Blip.tv the go-to source for short-form video entertainment, particularly content that will play well on mobile or devices like Roku and Google TV. In the latest So What Do You Do?, she explained to Mediabistro what her team looks for when scouting new programming.

“We have a pretty simple application process, and we have a human being actually watch your video and look at your application.” Day said. “We review the content, we rate it and a lot of this — we’re not very apologetic about saying it — is kind of subjective. We’re looking for quality, good storytelling with character development. We’re looking for episodic content, because that is what we focus on. We’re looking for production values, content that is often TV-14 and above.”

The best part? Once your content has been accepted and uploaded, Blip splits the revenue with you 50-50. Read more in So What Do You Do, Kelly Day, CEO of Blip?.

Nicholas Braun