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Research

New Report Says Smart TV Industry Reaching ‘Point of No Return’

smarttvAccording to an industry analysis done by Futuresource Consulting, smart TV manufacturers aren’t really benefiting from all the consumer activity around them, and that the industry is reaching a “point of no return.” Really?

The report says that:

In developed regions 30% of homes will own a smart TV by the end of 2014, rising to 70% by 2018. And people aren’t just buying the feature, they’re using it too. At present, around 80% of the smart TVs in people’s homes are connected to the internet, with the pervasion of embedded Wi-Fi and auto-boot on track to lift this figure to over 90% by 2016.

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TV Everywhere is Making Authenticated Content Easier to Access

TV EverywhereTV Everywhere is the technological ability to watch whatever you want, whenever, however you want it (from your phone, tablet, laptop, etc.). It’s included as part of your cable subscription service, so it comes at no extra charge to you. The best part is that it is easy. The TV Everywhere site (http://www.youcouldbewatching.tv/) by CTAM (Cable and Telecommunications Association for Marketing) will guide you through the log-in and authentication process online and direct you to the individual cable and networks apps so that you can start watching TV everywhere.

TV Advertisers: Only One in Five of You Is Advertising Correctly

lwywy, a cross-platform advertising company, found that only in five TV advertisers in the U.S. display a ‘clearly visible product’ on the homepage of its site. Yet, wywy’s research also shows, 80% of TV-inspired site visits happen within 90 seconds of the TV ad airing.

What do advertisers need to do in order to get it right? “The first and most important step is a change in mindset,” wywy co-founder and COO Andreas Schroeter told Lost Remote.“ Advertisers shouldn’t see TV and online as separate — integrating campaigns is necessary,” he continued.

With more consumers distracted while watching TV, oftentimes turning to second screen devices, advertisers should place the products they advertise about on their homepages. Even if this experience isn’t synched, brands are missing out on the opportunity to draw viewers following exposure to a commercial. Prominently displayed products on second screen homepages increases conversion rates two to five times. Read more

White Paper: TV Chatter and Brand Affinity

Today, Seevibes released a white paper on how users who tweet about television, Seevibes calls them TV Chatters, have stronger brand affinities. The research also has some good pointers about how brands can better reach TV tweeters.

You can download the full pdf here. In the meantime, here are some key points:

  • TV Chatters show almost three times more interest in brands on Twitter
  • On average, TV Chatters show an interest in 5 brands where as those who do not talk about television only about 2 brands.
  • TV Chatters talk more about brands on Twitter
  • People who have affinity with both television AND brands on Twitter are more engaged and more active
  • TV Chatters represent the majority of the audience and brand interactions.
  • 83% of interactions about brands come from TV Chatters
  • 79% of people who have affinity with a brand are TV Chatters
  • Communicate with an engaged public who has affinity to optimize your campaignsseevibes

 

Nielsen Research: Social TV Helps Build Time-Shifted Audiences

6a00d83451b36c69e2019b047e7a8f970d-800wiNielsen yesterday released research demonstrating that the more twitter volume there is during a show’s live airing, the more viewers it captures within the live +7 (the live airing plus the seven days after) window.

Scripted shows as a whole have larger audiences in the +7 window than during the live airing, but highly social scripted shows – think ‘The Walking Dead,’ ‘American Horror Story,’ and ‘Scandal’ – get an even bigger boost during this window. For “low social” programs, +7 audiences are 16% larger than live audiences. For “high social” programs, though, +7 audiences are 36% larger than live audiences.

The research shows how important it is for networks to pay attention to growing delayed audiences. At the same time, it also shows that they must continue to put resources towards social TV activations during live airings.

Below, more insights from Nielsen‘s research: Read more

TiVo Study: Multitasking Viewers Rarely Engage in TV-Related Side Activities

Tivo-logo-widescreenTiVo last week released results from its second annual ‘Multitasking and Social TV Survey.’ The company surveyed 856 people who watched at least seven hours of TV per week. 51% of respondents said that they multitask every time or almost every time they watch TV; this is compared to 36% who said they multitask in last year’s survey.

While multitasking is on the rise, more viewers are primarily paying attention to the show they’re watching. 47% of respondents’ total TV time is spent with their primary attention on the TV show while multitasking, compared to 39% in last year’s survey.

“Even given the proliferation of multitasking, viewers remain primarily focused on the television shows they are watching,” said TiVo Chief Research Officer Jonathan Steuer. “To paraphrase the Bard, the program’s the thing!”

TiVo’s study also confirms the findings of Deloitte’s latest Digital Democracy Survey, which was released in March: while multitasking is on the rise, viewers are not engaging much in second-screen activities related to the program.

Only 5% of respondents report TV-related multitasking every time or almost every time they watch TV, while 50% report never or almost never engaging in TV-related multitasking. Top TV-time activities include browsing the Internet (74%), reading or sending email (73%) and text messaging (71%).

Still, social TV marketers should note that 61% of the respondents said that they search the web for information about the shows that they watch and 47% said that they have ‘liked’ a show’s Facebook page.

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Below, more findings from the study:

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Infographic: Fans React to Homer and Peter Sharing the Small Screen Together

Family-Guy-and-The-SImpsons-Crossover‘The Simpsons Guy’ crossover episode aired last Sunday, and fans were at once taken aback and delighted.

According to our analytics partner Canvs, which measures Twitter sentiment, 10% of the emotional reactions included the word “worst” and 7% included “weird.” Still, the overwhelming majority of fans were excited for the Peter and Homer meet-up: 37% of reactions included “amazing” while 22% included “funny.” For such devoted fan bases it is surprising that only 36% of the 77,944 total tweets about the episode contained sentiment.

Below, some more insights from Canvs on what drove the Twitter conversation, followed by an infographic:

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Live-Tweeting TV Shows Lifts Conversation Volume and Follower Growth Rate

twitter-tv-500x306In a post last week for the Twitter’s Media Blog, Anjali Midha, the company’s Head of Global Media & Agency Research, unveiled the findings from a look into the short-term and long-term benefits of shows, stars, and brands live-Tweeting. The study stemmed from a May survey in partnership with FOX, the Advertising Research Foundation (ARF), and db5, which showed that 66% of Twitter users like to see Tweets from official show accounts (61% from actor/cast; 35% from the official show account; 24% from judges/host).

The most current study, according to Midha, “looked at two groups of like programs (for example, top dramas or reality shows) from the U.S. 2013-14 season: one that implemented regular live-Tweeting and one that did not. We then looked within each program to understand how episodes with live-Tweeting compared to their ‘baseline’ conversation levels on Twitter during episodes that did not feature live Tweeting.”

Below, the findings from the study, followed by an infographic of follower growth due to live-tweeting across different genres: Read more

Viacom Study: The 5 Steps to Series Fandom in the TV Everywhere Era

viacom-logo1Viacom today released the results of “Getting With the Program: TV’s Funnels, Paths and Hurdles,” a study the company conducted to explore how audiences discover, watch and become fans of TV shows.

The study, which surveyed more than 1,500 U.S. Viacom viewers ages 13-44, showed that people who use multiple devices to consume content prefer live TV and have stronger network loyalty than those watching shows on a single screen. 79% of the study participants say having more ways of accessing shows helps them try more programs and 78% wouldn’t have become fans of some shows if they couldn’t watch in multiple ways.

The most interesting part of the research is what Viacom calls the “Funnels to Fandom” – the process of becoming a fan, Viacom has found, takes place in five steps: Discovery, Research, Selection, Fandom, and Sharing. Read more

Twitter Users ‘Love’ the Suits Midseason Finale

SUITS -- "No Way Out" Episode 316 -- Pictured: Gabriel Macht as Harvey Specter -- (Photo by: Ian Watson/USA Network)The Suits midseason finale aired on Wednesday, and fans went wild. According to our analytics partner, Canvs, which measures Twitter sentiment for shows, the emotions “love,” “good,” “crazy,” “upset,” and “intense” all peaked during the five minutes following the show’s last scene (10:00-10:05). A big cliffhanger still has fans talking, and a plot-line involving Louis Litt, Pearson Specter’s most obnoxiously brilliant lawyer, will keep fans engaged on social during the hiatus.

Here are some other insights from Canvs followed by an infographic:

  • Louis had the most reactions of any character on the show. He was mentioned in 10.2% of all reactions. He was mentioned even more than the shows title, “Suits,” which was only mentioned in 9.8% of reactions.
  • The show’s cliffhanger got fans tweeting up a storm. There were 492 reactions out of 1,617 tweets in the five minutes after the show ended (10:00-10:05). This was higher by far than any peak during the show’s airtime.

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Study: Advertisers Can’t Spend on TV Alone Anymore

wywyCollective, a cross-platform advertising company, and Viggle, the social TV check-in and rewards company, have been trying to convince advertisers that they cannot rely solely on linear TV advertising to reach consumers. Now, a recent study released by wywy (another cross-platform advertising company) and TNS Infratet finds that while second screen usage generally erodes TV advertising effectiveness, cross-platform advertising solutions used in conjunction with a traditional linear spend can actually improve ad awareness among second screen users who are also watching TV.

According to the study (conducted bt TNS Infratest, commissioned by wywy), among viewers who used a second screen device while watching TV, the TV ad awareness dropped 58 percent compared to TV-only viewers participating in the study.

The study also found that when cross-media ad technology synching the delivery of TV and online ads onto the second screen was used, TV ad awareness increased by more than 40 percent, creating an uplift among the mobile and tablet users. Read more

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